1-833-MTB-GIFT

Resources

River Road Church

  • Best to call on Fridays
  • CM must call (referral needed)
  • (804) 288-1131
  • If the assistance is for rent and/or deposit- you must have the address, landlord name and phone number

Bethlehem Baptist Church

  • (804)262-8339 
  • 4210 Penick Rd, Henrico, VA 23228
  • (804) 623-3404

Hatcher Memorial Church

  • (804) 266-9696

H.O.M.E.

  • (804) 354-0641

Eviction deterrence program

  • 1st Baptist Church
  • (804)355-8637
  • Call Monday, Wednesday or Thursday between 1-3pm
  • 2709 Monument Ave, Richmond, VA 23220

CAPUP

  • Richmond- (804)788-0050
  • Petersburg- (804)722-9577
  • Aids low-income clients with emergency rent, mortgage, utility and medical funding assistance to help prevent homelessness, hunger or suffering.  Emergency food, clothing and transportation are also available.

Webber Memorial Church

CCHASM

  • (804) 796-2749
  • As funds are available, CCHASM is able to assist area residents that are facing a temporary financial hardship.  Our screening process is very thorough, aiding in discernment of legitimate emergency needs and core issues as opposed to chronic on-going needs.
  • PO Box 1741 Chesterfield, VA 23832

Grace Community Baptist Church

  • (804) 740-4148
  • 2400 Pump Rd Henrico, Virginia 23233

St Ann’s Church

  • Ashland residents only
  • (804) 526-0424
  • 105 S Snead St, Ashland, VA 23005

Heights Baptist Church

  • (804) 266-3551
  • 17201 Jefferson Davis Hwy, Colonial Heights, VA 23834

Crown & Joy Presbyterian Church

  • (804) 298-5241
  • 1000 Westover Hills Blvd, Richmond, VA
  • Chesterfield Department of Social Services | 804-748-1100 | Ask for the Assessment and Resource Team

Coalition of Powhatan Churches | 804-598-4464 | Collaboration of area churches, businesses, & civic organizations | For Powhatan residents

  •  Powhatan Food Pantry | (804) 372-9526 | 2500 Patterson Road, Powhatan, VA

o Tues/Thurs/Fri/Sat 10am-12pm and Thurs nights 5pm-7pm

  •  Transportation
  •  Rent/Mortgage
  •  Food
  •  Fuel (Firewood/Electric/Oil)
  •  Small Home Repairs
  •  Medical
  •  Prescription for Success
  •  Emergency Shelter
  •  Cars to Work Program
  •  Dentistry

Ephesus SDA Church | 804-233-5201 | 3700 Midlothian Tpk., Richmond VA 23224

Only helps Richmond zip codes 23224 and 23225 – Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

  •  Rental assistance only for non-evictions; amount varies week to week depending on amount collected over the weekend
  •  Utility assistance only if they haven’t received a shut-off notice
  •  Food pantry and clothing closet
  •   

Faith Landmarks Ministries |804-262-7104 |8491 Chamberlayne Rd., Richmond, VA 23227

  •  Financial assistance for rent or utility bill (must have documentation to support the request)
  •  Amount is on case-by-case basis, but for non-members, they may be able to help with $50
  •  Must fill out application at the church and bring I.D.

First Presbyterian Church |4602 Cary Street Road, Richmond, VA 23226 |804-358-2383

Only 1-2 referrals a month   / Can help with rental assistance & utility bill

  •  Must be referred by a DSS social worker (or get verification of services from any other agency)
  •  Financial assistance is up to $150 per year/person
  •  Assist residents of Richmond & Henrico
  •  Client will need to sign an ROI for rental assistance (so they can speak to landlord)
  •  For utility bill assistance, bill will have to be faxed

FISH |PO Box 38212, Henrico, VA 23231 | 804-257-7730 | Helps with zip codes 23222, 23223, 23231, 23150, and 23075

Henrico DSS Info & Referral Line (via Hearth grant) | 804-501-5294

  • Very limited, specific event in the last 60 days, sustainable

Mechanicsville Churches Emergency Functions | 804-357-4093 | PO Box 604, Mechanicsville, VA 23111 | (zip codes 23111, 23116) | Call and give your name, address, agency information 

Moments of Hope Outreach, Inc.| 804-913-9118| 13400 Hanover Courthouse Road, Hanover, VA  23069

For Hanover residents

  •  Sometimes pay for hotel assistance, typically during colder months
  •  Food Pantry – (804) 913-9151, available Mon/Thurs/Sat 9am-12pm and Tues/Wed 7pm-9pm
  •  Breakfast 2nd & 4th Saturday of the month 9am-10 am at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church on 8050 St. Paul’s Church Road, Hanover, VA  23069
  •  Lunch every Saturday 1:30pm at 5300 Chamberlayne Road, Hanover – across the parking lot from Food Lion in the Brook Hill Azalea Parking Center

o On-site nurse health screenings

o Donated bikes & bike repair

o Bus passes

o Can give out some tent and sleeping bags

o Help desk to assist with applying for health insurance, employment, & social services

Powhatan Community Action Agency |804-598-5630| 3908 Old Buckingham Road, Powhatan, VA 23139| For Powhatan residents | Have to meet an income requirement, but can help with rental assistance, deposit assistance (up to $800), and deposit assistance| Cannot receive assistance if you already have within the past 12 months | Have to go in and fill out an application and bring in your bill for utility assistance and bring in your lease and eviction notice for rental.

Richmond City DSS, Family Preservation |900 E. Marshall Street, Richmond, VA 23219 |804-646-0180

The Sophie House |804-658-5214 | 4771 Shady Grove Road, Glen Allen, Va 23059 | Henrico

Supportive services for single women and women with children

Society of St. Vincent DePaul |804-527-1037 | Only serves Henrico zip codes 23255, 23294, 23060, 23228, 23059, 23233

St. James’ Episcopal Church |Nancy Warman |804-355-1779 |1205 W. Franklin St., Richmond, VA 23220

St. John’s Church | 804-649-7938 | 2401 E. Broad Street, Richmond, VA 23223 | Requirements: Needs to have a source of income and needs to have tried to receive assistance through Social Services first

Trinity Baptist Church |804-321-2427 | 2811 Fendall Ave, Richmond, VA 23222

Virginia Supportive Housing |Veteran Intake Coordinator | Richmond, VA 23219 |804-788-6825 ext 260| Only for Veterans| Supportive & Permanent Housing is available

WHEAT |PO Box 171, Beaverdam, VA 23015|1-877-559-4328 |For those in Western Hanover County| Only assists residents for zip codes: 23015, 23047, 23192, and 23146

City of Richmond Eviction Diversion Program | 1-833-663-8428, press 4 | Only for tenants renting in the City of Richmond

Tenants Must:

Come to court on the court date and pay 25% of the amount due.

            Explain the reason for falling behind in rent.

            Be able to pay ongoing rent when due AND catch up on the back rent.

            Have a good rent paying record:

  Not been late more than twice in a 6-month period.

  1.  Not been late more than three times in a 12-month period.
  2.  Not been in an Eviction Diversion Program in the last 12 months.
  3.  Not had an unlawful detainer dismissed by paying current in the last 6 months.
  4. Participation Requires the Landlord’s Agreement. If not, the case will be handled in the usual manner. 

Chesterfield Department of Social Services | 804-748-1100 | Ask for the Assessment and Resource Team

Coalition of Powhatan Churches | 804-598-4464 | Collaboration of area churches, businesses, & civic organizations | For Powhatan residents

  •  Powhatan Food Pantry | (804) 372-9526 | 2500 Patterson Road, Powhatan, VA

o Tues/Thurs/Fri/Sat 10am-12pm and Thurs nights 5pm-7pm

  •  Transportation
  •  Rent/Mortgage
  •  Food
  •  Fuel (Firewood/Electric/Oil)
  •  Small Home Repairs
  •  Medical
  •  Prescription for Success
  •  Emergency Shelter
  •  Cars to Work Program
  •  Dentistry

Ephesus SDA Church | 804-233-5201 | 3700 Midlothian Tpk., Richmond VA 23224

Only helps Richmond zip codes 23224 and 23225 – Tuesdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

  •  Rental assistance only for non-evictions; amount varies week to week depending on amount collected over the weekend
  •  Utility assistance only if they haven’t received a shut-off notice
  •  Food pantry and clothing closet

Faith Landmarks Ministries |804-262-7104 |8491 Chamberlayne Rd., Richmond, VA 23227

  •  Financial assistance for rent or utility bill (must have documentation to support the request)
  •  Amount is on case-by-case basis, but for non-members, they may be able to help with $50
  •  Must fill out application at the church and bring I.D.

First Presbyterian Church |4602 Cary Street Road, Richmond, VA 23226 |804-358-2383

Only 1-2 referrals a month   / Can help with rental assistance & utility bill

  •  Must be referred by a DSS social worker (or get verification of services from any other agency)
  •  Financial assistance is up to $150 per year/person
  •  Assist residents of Richmond & Henrico
  •  Client will need to sign an ROI for rental assistance (so they can speak to landlord)
  •  For utility bill assistance, bill will have to be faxed

FISH |PO Box 38212, Henrico, VA 23231 | 804-257-7730 | Helps with zip codes 23222, 23223, 23231, 23150, and 23075

Henrico DSS Info & Referral Line (via Hearth grant) | 804-501-5294

  •  Very limited, specific event in the last 60 days, sustainable

Mechanicsville Churches Emergency Functions | 804-357-4093 | PO Box 604, Mechanicsville, VA 23111 | (zip codes 23111, 23116) | Call and give your name, address, agency information 

Moments of Hope Outreach, Inc. | 804-913-9118| 13400 Hanover Courthouse Road, Hanover, VA  23069

For Hanover residents

  •  Sometimes pay for hotel assistance, typically during colder months
  •  Food Pantry – (804) 913-9151, available Mon/Thurs/Sat 9am-12pm and Tues/Wed 7pm-9pm
  •  Breakfast 2nd & 4th Saturday of the month 9am-10 am at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church on 8050 St. Paul’s Church Road, Hanover, VA  23069
  •  Lunch every Saturday 1:30pm at 5300 Chamberlayne Road, Hanover – across the parking lot from Food Lion in the Brook Hill Azalea Parking Center

o On-site nurse health screenings

o Donated bikes & bike repair

o Bus passes

o Can give out some tent and sleeping bags

o Help desk to assist with applying for health insurance, employment, & social services

Powhatan Community Action Agency |804-598-5630| 3908 Old Buckingham Road, Powhatan, VA 23139| For Powhatan residents | Have to meet an income requirement, but can help with rental assistance, deposit assistance (up to $800), and deposit assistance| Cannot receive assistance if you already have within the past 12 months | Have to go in and fill out an application and bring in your bill for utility assistance and bring in your lease and eviction notice for rental.

Richmond City DSS, Family Preservation |900 E. Marshall Street, Richmond, VA 23219 |804-646-0180

The Sophie House |804-658-5214 | 4771 Shady Grove Road, Glen Allen, Va 23059 | Henrico

Supportive services for single women and women with children

Society of St. Vincent DePaul |804-527-1037 | Only serves Henrico zip codes 23255, 23294, 23060, 23228, 23059, 23233

St. James’ Episcopal Church |Nancy Warman |804-355-1779 |1205 W. Franklin St., Richmond, VA 23220

St. John’s Church | 804-649-7938 | 2401 E. Broad Street, Richmond, VA 23223 | Requirements: Needs to have a source of income and needs to have tried to receive assistance through Social Services first

Trinity Baptist Church |804-321-2427 | 2811 Fendall Ave, Richmond, VA 23222

Virginia Supportive Housing |Veteran Intake Coordinator | Richmond, VA 23219 |804-788-6825 ext 260| Only for Veterans| Supportive & Permanent Housing is available

WHEAT |PO Box 171, Beaverdam, VA 23015|1-877-559-4328 |For those in Western Hanover County| Only assists residents for zip codes: 23015, 23047, 23192, and 23146

City of Richmond Eviction Diversion Program | 1-833-663-8428, press 4 | Only for tenants renting in the City of Richmond

Tenants Must:

Come to court on the court date and pay 25% of the amount due.

            Explain the reason for falling behind in rent.

            Be able to pay ongoing rent when due AND catch up on the back rent.

            Have a good rent paying record:

  Not been late more than twice in a 6-month period.

  1. Not been late more than three times in a 12-month period.
  2. Not been in an Eviction Diversion Program in the last 12 months.
  3. Not had an unlawful detainer dismissed by paying current in the last 6 months.
  4. Participation Requires the Landlord’s Agreement. If not, the case will be handled in the usual manner.

There are a number of federal and state programs that provide financial benefits to individuals and families. These benefits, known as entitlements, are primarily set up for low-income households, the elderly, and the disabled. Each entitlement has eligibility requirements. There are also programs administered through state governments that can help with health care related needs. Government assistance programs include:

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services
Information on public assistance and food stamps
Check phonebook for your local office
www.hhs.gov

U.S. Administration on Aging
Benefits for older adults
800-677-1116
www.eldercare.gov
(Eldercare Locator finds resources in your community)

Social Security Administration
800-772-1213
www.ssa.gov

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services
800-633-4227
www.cms.gov

CancerCare

800-813-HOPE(4673)
www.cancercare.org

American Cancer Society
800-ACS-2345
www.cancer.org

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society
800-955-4572
www.lls.org

Lymphoma Research Foundation
800-500-9976
www.lymphoma.org

National Marrow Donor Program
888-999-6743
www.marrow.org

Patient Advocate Foundation’s Colorectal Careline
866-657-8634
www.colorectalcareline.org

Sarcoma Alliance
415-381-7236
www.sarcomaalliance.org

Neuroblastoma is a cancer that develops in the sympathetic nervous system, which is the network of nerves that carries messages from the brain throughout the body. The cancer develops as solid tumors — lumps or masses — in the adrenal glands, abdomen, neck, chest, or pelvis. The tumors can also spread to other parts of the body such as the bones and blood-forming bone marrow. Although research is intensive and ongoing, we still don’t know what causes neuroblastoma. Most doctors and scientists believe it’s an accidental growth that occurs during the development of the sympathetic nervous system.

Symptoms

A person with neuroblastoma may experience one or more of the following symptoms:

  • aches and pains
  • fevers
  • weight loss or poor appetite
  • swelling of the abdomen (referred to as a distended abdomen)
  • limping or difficulty walking
  • Because many of these symptoms are similar to those of other, more common childhood diseases, many children aren’t diagnosed with neuroblastoma until after the cancer has already begun to metastasize (spread) to other parts of the body.
  • Neuroblastoma is a common and often difficult to treat cancer, the most common cancer in infancy.
  • In the United States, about 700 children are diagnosed with neuroblastoma each year.
  • It is the most common tumor found in children younger than 1 year of age.
  • Neuroblastoma is the most common extra cranial solid tumor cancer in children.
  • Every 16 hours a child with neuroblastoma dies.
  • There is no known cure for relapsed neuroblastoma.
  • Nearly 70% of those children first diagnosed with neuroblastoma have disease that has already metastasized or spread to other parts of the body.
  • When disease has spread at diagnosis and a child is over the age of 2, there is less than a 30% chance of survival.

Facts about Pediatric Cancer

The loss of a child to cancer is one of the worst tragedies a family can face. Each death means the loss of an entire lifetime. And survivors face serious medical complications, secondary cancers, cognitive impairments and shortened lifespans.

Facts about Pediatric Cancer Incidence and Mortality

  • Incidence of invasive pediatric cancers is up 29% in the past 20 years.
  • Each year around 13,500 children are diagnosed with cancer in the US, that’s more than a classroom of kids a day.
  • 35,000 children are currently in treatment for cancer.
  • Some 25% of all kids who are diagnosed with cancer die.
  • Some pediatric brain tumors, such as brain stem gliomas and pontine gliomas, are terminal upon diagnosis and no new protocols have been developed in 30 years.
  • Many pediatric cancers, including neuroblastoma and disseminated medulloblastoma, are terminal upon progression or recurrence.
  • More children die of cancer every year than adults died in 9/11.
  • Cancer kills more children than AIDs, asthma, diabetes, cystic fibrosis and congenital anomalies combined.
  • The average age of death for a child with cancer is 8, causing a child to lose 69 years of expected life.
  • The death of a child is one of the most traumatic events a family might face.
  • Families who have lost children are often financially and emotionally depleted.

Facts about Pediatric Cancer Survivors

  • 74% of childhood cancer survivors have chronic illnesses, and some 40% of childhood cancer survivors have severe illnesses or die from such illnesses.
  • Childhood cancer survivors are at significant risk for secondary cancers later in life.
  • Cancer treatments can affect a child’s growth, fertility, and endocrine system. Child survivors may be permanently immunologically suppressed.
  • Radiation to a child’s brain can significantly damage cognitive function, or if radiation is given at a very young age, limiting the ability to read, do basic math, tell time or even talk.
  • Physical and neurocognitive disabilities resulting from treatment may prevent childhood cancer survivors from fully participating in school, social activities and eventually work, which can cause depression and feelings of isolation.
  • Childhood cancer survivors have difficulty getting married and obtaining jobs, health and life insurance.

“Social Outcomes in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study Cohort”, Journal of Clinical Oncology, February 17, 2009.

National Action Plan for Childhood Cancer, Report on the National Summit Meetings on Childhood Cancer. American Cancer Society, http://www.cancer.org/downloads/PRO/childhood_cancer_action_plan.pdf

  • Childhood cancer is the number one disease killer in children.
  • There are 15 children diagnosed with cancer for every one child diagnosed with pediatric AIDS. Yet, the U.S. invests approximately $595,000 for research per victim of pediatric AIDS and only $20,000 for each victim of childhood cancer.
  • Cancer kills more children than any other disease, more than Asthma, Cystic Fibrosis, Diabetes and Pediatric AIDS combined.
  • Sadly, over 2,300 children with cancer die each year.
  • Every school day 46 children are diagnosed.
  • 1 in 330 children will have the disease by age 20.
  • Cancers in very young children are highly aggressive and behave unlike malignant diseases at other times in life.
  • 80% of children have metastasized cancer at the time of their diagnosis. At diagnosis, only 20% of adults with cancer show evidence that the disease has spread or metastasized.
  • Detecting childhood cancers at an early stage, when the disease would react more favorably to treatment, is extremely difficult.
  • Cancer symptoms in children include fever, swollen glands, anemia, bruises and infection are often suspected to be, and at the early stages are treated as, other childhood illnesses.
  • Even with insurance coverage, a family will have out-of pocket expenses of about $40,000 per year, not including travel.
  • Treatment can continue for several years, depending on the type of cancer and the type of therapy given.

Causes of Childhood Cancer

  • Every family is potentially at risk.
  • In almost all cases, childhood cancers arise from non-inherited mutations (or changes) in the genes of growing cells.
  • As these errors occur randomly and unpredictably, there is currently no effective way to predict or prevent them.

Cancer Research Funding

  • Nationally, childhood cancer is 20x more prevalent than pediatric AIDS.
  • Pediatric AIDS receives 4x the funding that childhood cancer receives.
  • In one month there are 2x as many deaths from childhood cancer as pediatric AIDS for the entire year.
  • Only 3% of the National Cancer Institute Budget goes toward pediatric cancer research.
  • September is Pediatric Cancer Awareness Month, which nationally goes unrecognized.
  • Currently there are between 30,000 ? 40,000 children undergoing cancer treatment in the U.S.
  • Young patients often have a more advanced stage of cancer when first diagnosed. Approximately 20% of adults with cancer show evidence of metastasis at diagnosis, yet almost 80% of children have metastases at diagnosis.
  • Today, up to 75% of the children with cancer can be cured, yet some forms of childhood cancer have proven so resistant to treatment that, in spite of research, a cure is illusive.
  • There are 15 children diagnosed with cancer for every one child diagnosed with pediatric AIDS. Yet, the U.S. invests approximately $595,000 for research per victim of pediatric AIDS and only $20,000 for each victim of childhood cancer.
  • The National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) federal budget for 2003 was $4.6 billion. Of that, breast cancer received 12%, prostate cancer received 7%, and all 12 major groups of pediatric cancers combined received less than 3%.